Buddhist Thoughts – Suffering

I get a lot of positive feedback on my Buddhist thoughts. Hence I continue and try to write about one post a week. Bear with me, it isn’t always easy. I might bring in some thoughts from various books soon for some inspirational thoughts.

For now, I still have a few things I want to cover with the help of quotes:

Within the framework of the Buddhist Path, reflecting on suffering has tremendous importance because by realizing the nature of suffering, you will develop greater resolve to put an end to the causes of suffering and the unwholesome deeds which lead to suffering. And it will increase your enthusiasm for engaging in the wholesome actions and deeds which lead to happiness and joy.

– His Holiness the Dalai Lama

Suffering. I wrote about “I may die today” a while back. So dying is suffering?

The Buddhist path, the samsara, the never ending – unless enlightened – rebirth cycle, is full of suffering. We encounter suffering because of things we have done in the past. Karma.

We need to reflect on the suffering. We need to find out why we are suffering.

This can be anything from lower back pain which might just be a sign of stress, to an unfulfilled task which we need to finish. Something that might nag us in the back of our mind or in our unconscious. Similar to what I have written about before, if there are challenges in life you have to overcome, those issues will occur until they are resolved. They are part of our suffering.

Let’s look at an example. If you for instance always come up against the same problem with your managers in your job, no matter how often you change it, then the likelihood is that this has something to do with you. This ongoing suffering is something you need to embrace and get to the bottom of. Resolving that issue inside you will allow for you to rid yourself from that problem. Eliminating the suffering.

If you are capable of doing so, you are capable of putting more positive energy into happiness and joy. More time can be spend to increase your enthusiasm for good deeds.

This example is to my mind a great example for Buddhist philosophy playing part of your productivity and helping you to perform better at work. If you are self conscious and work on yourself and issues you might have, then you rid yourself of things that eat into your energy. Moving forward you will suffer less and gain more energy in order to be more productive, or to work even harder on yourself.

Buddhism and Management are closely related.

Love and Kindness from my little part of the world.

Volker