Tag: vision

Living in a new world – Days at home (42)

Day 42. Week 7.

I finally launched my online coaching course today. I really hope it helps people to discover their true values, purpose and mission in lifediscover their true values, purpose and mission in life. The time is now to explore and identify what you really want to do in life.

It’s a project that kept me busy for the past 6 months, and one of the reasons I focused on part-time / contract work. I hope this course not only offers value, but it will transform your life. If it does, please recommend it to others too.

As of an update: the weekend was busy. With rainy weather, we focused on indoor activities, including finishing this 1000 piece puzzle of approximately 200 VW camper vans. That was fun 😉 I also listened to a lot of Tim Ferris podcasts.

The boys enjoyed watching the Hobbit.

I also updated this blog template a bit, and will change some of my websites over the coming months. Change is good, it is constant.

Now, this week, I am curious how Boris will get us out of the lockdown, and then full steam ahead. All I need is a new job I suppose.

Have a great week,
Volker

Hedonic Well-being – What is it?

In a recent podcast recording my guest spoke about hedonic well-being. Since I didn’t know too much about it, I thought I research it and clarify it in a post for anyone who is interested.

It seems that well being has been derived from two general perspectives, extrinsic and intrinsic.

One is the hedonic, more extrinsic, approach. This approach focuses on happiness and pleasure attainment, pain avoidance. So moving towards pleasure and happiness, moving away from pain. That makes a lot of sense to me, and would probably make sense to most people.

Hedonic motivation

However, there is a eudaemonic or eudaimonic, a more intrinsic approach, too. This is about self-realisation and well-being is defined by the degree to which a person is fully functioning.

Positive Psychology has a great article summarising what eudaemonic well-being means. It first was mentioned by Aristotle who thought that true happiness is found by leading a virtuous life and doing what is worth doing; realising human potential is the ultimate human goal. Stoics play a role here, who stressed the value of self-discipline, others argue that happiness is pursued through prudence.

For me, most of the time, happiness comes down to your own definition. Similar to success. Success can mean happiness, but most podcast guests argue it’s not the same. A philosophical rather than a psychological question I suppose.

As an executive and productivity coach I often use Maslow’s hierarchy of needs or the six human needs by Tony Robbins to look at happiness, fulfilment and level of need fulfilment. If you are not familiar with the models, or need further info, feel free to give me a shout. They are simple, yet powerful frameworks to use in order to establish one’s motivation.

Also the hedonic approach is based on some simple motivational directions I learned during my NLP Master-Practitioner: moving away from something or moving towards to something. A vision pulls you, and therefore has usually a stronger, more positive motivation, than something you don’t like. Yet fear is also known as motivator, mainly to move away from.

sensory acuity

Inspired by the book I am reading Turning Passions into Profit – 3 Steps to Wealth and Power and my NLP Master Practitioner with Sensory Systems in Glasgow, I revisited the term of “sensory acuity” today.

Christopher Howard writes about the importance of sensory acuity as people with outstanding communication skills are able to notice things in their sensory awareness that others do not. Being able to notice on all levels of senses gives you an advantage and the ability to notice things that most people don’t even realise exist. It will unlock your potential to create the results you desire in your interpersonal communication.

Which senses are we speaking about:

* sight – visual sense
* sound – auditory sense
* feelings – kinesthetic sense
* smell – olfactory sense
* taste – gustatory sense

And, what impressed me with Howard is that he differentiates, as a true NLP professional, between the inner and the outer world. Depending on our models we perceive the world differently. Being aware of the different senses and being able to read (and write) them, will make us better communicators.

NLP has the model of input (senses) that then “relate and compute” (pattern/map) into output (behaviour). We also add the “feed-forward”, a prediction what will happen in the world. And, all of that is put back into a feedback loop to how we perceive the world and being “sensory acute” about it.

Our internal voice is referred to as “audio digital” input rather than the audio sense, analog, of the external world.

How is that useful?

We can use those senses for goal setting by visualising an outcome and then put that picture in our head. And, it will feel good and you might want to imagine a certain smell, taste or music with it. You can talk to yourself as well and really get a goal into your head. A vision! This vision can be turned into a nice state of mind and something to look forward to. It will sink into your unconscious and your actions will be working towards that goal and objective.

Also, another example, would be if you remember a certain situation. Your last holiday on the beach? You remember the sound of the waves, the smell of the sea and the image….. Don’t you remember the good old time when you turn the radio on and they play a song that you have not heard for ages and it reminds you of your “wild days”?

Sweet memories 🙂