Category: Ballueder Partners

What if all of your sales team performed like the top 5%?

The other day I had the conversation with a sales leader about coaching their team in productivity, Emotional Intelligence (EQ) and general performance.

This discussion came on the back of an executive leadership coaching discussion I had with the management team. In this case they just went through a big transformation of the company.

The challenge was not very uncommon: the executive team and team leaders are either not trained in coaching their teams, or too busy. Time is a huge challenge for most of them. Transitions, mergers, acquisitions and general restructures affect the time they have to spend with their teams, and this ultimately has a negative impact on performance.

Most team performances goes up, if the team lead spends regular time and carry out 1:1 with their teams. This way they identify blockers they can resolve, and help them on their journey, motivate them to do better. This is what I have found in my 15 years in sales and client services life.

When I asked the question, what if all of your sales team performed like the top 5%, the eyes of the sales leader lit up. Imagine, she said, not only would we add 20% more revenue to the bottom line, the overall performance would increase as the team would be more motivated.

Now, there is no one size fits all solution for any sales or account management team. But there are so many things you can do with a team, in order to just get them to perform better. Motivation, goal alignment, culture, breaks, mindfulness, Emotional Intelligence (EQ), or modelling the top performers, teaching those skills to the team.

Whatever it takes, to get the whole team to perform like the top 5%, we will work with you to make it happen. Just give us a call or a drop us an email to arrange an initial chat. Bespoke programmes are available, starting with your executive team, working the way into your teams. A holistic approach always works best. But let’s talk and see what works.

Speak soon! My contact details are on Ballueder Partners website.

Hedonic Well-being – What is it?

In a recent podcast recording my guest spoke about hedonic well-being. Since I didn’t know too much about it, I thought I research it and clarify it in a post for anyone who is interested.

It seems that well being has been derived from two general perspectives, extrinsic and intrinsic.

One is the hedonic, more extrinsic, approach. This approach focuses on happiness and pleasure attainment, pain avoidance. So moving towards pleasure and happiness, moving away from pain. That makes a lot of sense to me, and would probably make sense to most people.

Hedonic motivation

However, there is a eudaemonic or eudaimonic, a more intrinsic approach, too. This is about self-realisation and well-being is defined by the degree to which a person is fully functioning.

Positive Psychology has a great article summarising what eudaemonic well-being means. It first was mentioned by Aristotle who thought that true happiness is found by leading a virtuous life and doing what is worth doing; realising human potential is the ultimate human goal. Stoics play a role here, who stressed the value of self-discipline, others argue that happiness is pursued through prudence.

For me, most of the time, happiness comes down to your own definition. Similar to success. Success can mean happiness, but most podcast guests argue it’s not the same. A philosophical rather than a psychological question I suppose.

As an executive and productivity coach I often use Maslow’s hierarchy of needs or the six human needs by Tony Robbins to look at happiness, fulfilment and level of need fulfilment. If you are not familiar with the models, or need further info, feel free to give me a shout. They are simple, yet powerful frameworks to use in order to establish one’s motivation.

Also the hedonic approach is based on some simple motivational directions I learned during my NLP Master-Practitioner: moving away from something or moving towards to something. A vision pulls you, and therefore has usually a stronger, more positive motivation, than something you don’t like. Yet fear is also known as motivator, mainly to move away from.